Mayi Kuwayu: the National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing

Ngiyampaa Country

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been saying for a long time that strong culture is related to good health and wellbeing. Mayi Kuwayu, the National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing is a comprehensive longitudinal study into how culture impacts health and wellbeing.

Our research team will follow a large number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over time. Any Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person from 16 years of age can participate. The study aims to survey a large number of people, ensuring there is national representation to gain a highly detailed understanding of the relationship between culture and wellbeing.

Culture the key to health and wellbeing?

The Mayi Kuwayu Study will examine how wellbeing is linked to connection to country, cultural practices, spirituality, language use and other factors. This is the first time a national study of this type has been conducted. It will create an evidence base for the creation of better policies and programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Research by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The Mayi Kuwayu Study is led by Wongaibon (Ngiyampaa) man Dr Raymond Lovett from the Australian National University. Mayi Kuwayu study partners include a number of peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations. Together with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health program area at the ANU, the partners and study governance have the required cultural, technical, and community expertise to conduct a study of this scale.

This study has been created by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander controlled research resource.

Mayi Kuwayu website

To learn more about the study, please visit the Mayi Kuwayu website.

Partnerships

Mayi Kuwayu study partners include peak Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations. We acknowledge the importance of connecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations with researchers and policymakers.

The Mayi Kuwayu Study is funded by:

  • The Lowitja Institute
  • The National Health and Medical Research Council

Our partners are:

Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia logo
Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia logo
Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies logo
National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation logo
Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Inc.
Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation logo
Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services logo